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The Bermuda Triangle

Over the course of many years, dozens of ships, planes, and people have gone missing on or around the mysterious Bermuda Triangle. How could these 15,000 ton creations disappear without a trace? How can this seemingly normal stretch of sea kill thousands of people? How can science explain the Bermuda Triangle?

Located in the North Atlantic Ocean at exactly 25 degrees north and 75 degrees west, the Bermuda Triangle waits for wandering ships and planes to stray into its deadly territory. According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Bermuda Triangle takes up approximately 500,000 square miles of water between Bermuda, Puerto Rico, and Florida. For years people have been mystified with the disappearance of some humongous machines. Even in the best weather this dreaded triangle will take the lives of hundreds. Despite all this information, the most baffling fact about the Bermuda Triangle, also called the Devil’s Triangle, is that all the missing boats and airplanes seem to have vanished entirely. None of them even sent a distress signal. 

Scientist or not, many people have tried to explain why most things that enter the Bermuda Triangle never emerge.  Some say that there is a vortex that will suck up something and send it to a different dimension. Another theory is that the Bermuda Triangle is a sign of the lost city of Atlantis, some even say that the area is haunted. Though none of these seem likely, there is one theory that people have reason to believe. According to BigThink.com the reason for the mysteries in the Bermuda Triangle area are strange hexagonal clouds. Meteorologists explain that these create 170 miles per hour air bombs. The wind-filled pockets of air drop abruptly on unsuspecting aircraft and ships, sinking them almost instantly. We know now to watch out for this dangerous area where, as far as we know, 75 planes have disappeared and hundreds of ships have sunk.

 

By: Alessy Madero

Photo Credits: https://www.iol.co.za

Categories: Article

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